Shorten Your Flower Miles with Slow Flowers

Slow FlowersThere are a number of ways we can cut down on our environmental footprint, ranging from using alternative transportation to watching our water use to eating locally to avoiding excess packaging to shopping locally and more. Many of those methods also help to boost local economies, while cutting down the amount of transportation-related money and energy (and pollution), and while we may already be familiar with the slow food and local food movements, there’s a new-ish kid on the block that promises to help shorten our “flower miles”.

According to the above image, in the current $7 to $8 billion flower market, about 80% of the flowers sold for bouquets and arrangements at American florists are imported (mostly from Colombia), and only 20% come from domestically-grown flowers, so sourcing flowers closer to home can help cut flower miles while also supporting domestic flower farmers. But if you want to buy from a florist that uses domestic flowers, how do you find one?

Before the launch of Slow Flowers, that task could be quite challenging. But thanks to the work of Debra Prinzing (and a successful crowdfunding campaign), if you want to find florists, shops, and farmers who grow and source domestic American flowers, it’s now just a click away.

This free online florist directory helps guide you to florists, event planners, designers, and even supermarket flower departments that use American grown flowers and support domestic flower farmers.

“It’s simple. When you contact a florist, flower shop or designer on SLOW FLOWERS, they commit to you, the consumer, that their flowers are truly homegrown.

You should be able to know the origins of the flowers you order to send to a loved one. You should be assured that the bouquet you carry down the aisle was grown by an American flower farmer. You should know that jobs are being created and nurtured in your community.”

Not only is this a boon to the conscious consumer who wants to know the┬áprovenance of their flowers, but it also indicates that there’s a huge opportunity for American flower farmers and florists to grow their businesses by participating in and promoting the local flower movement.

Find out more at Slow Flowers.

[Image: (c) Slow Flowers LLC]

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About the Author

lives in southwestern New Mexico and digs bicycles, simple living, organic gardening, sustainable lifestyle design, slacklining, bouldering, and permaculture. He loves good food, with fresh roasted chiles at the top of his list of favorites. Catch up with Derek on Twitter, RebelMouse, Google+, or at his natural parenting site, Natural Papa!